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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
recognize mrs. johnson for her opening statement. >> thank you very much, mr. chairman, and good morning to all. i want to welcome my witnesses and a former chair. and look forward to all the testimony. at this time, the democratic caucus is having an organizational meeting that was supposed to start at 9:00, but because of the lateness of the ranking member meeting, it started a little bit late. today's hearing is an important one for the committee. nasa is a critical part of the nation's research and development enterprise, as well as being a source of inspiration for young people and a worldwide symbol of american technological power, leadership, and good will. we want nasa to succeed in its endeavors. its success benefits our nation in many ways. in establishing nasa to the space act of 1958, congress directed the agency to contribute materially to the role of the united states as a leader in the aeronautical and space science and technology, and the application thereof, to the conduct of peaceful activities within and outside the atmosphere. successive nasa authorization acts over t
to the house that she has on her agenda. mr. sessions: the gentleman is correct and we expect those. mr. woodall: this is the kind of house, deliberative house, i came to be part of two short years ago. we have the ability to get these things done in the next few days. i reject the idea that i read over and over again that this house has been delaying action this house got it right wetch got it right in a budget in april of 2011, we got it right in our budget in 2012, we got it right when we passed aest sequester replacement and we're getting it right with this rule today. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the gentlelady from california, our leader, ms. pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. pelosi: thank you very much, madam chair. ranking member. thank you, mr. speaker. why did i sort of smell smoke when i heard this debate? it's reminiscent of nero fiddling while rome burned. the american people are waiting for us to get the
agree with her completely, mr. speaker. it's very important that we not let the sequester take place and i hope and believe that she is right, that we will not see that happen. and number two, i'd like to associate myself with her remarks as it relates to ensuring that we do not go over the fiscal cliff. that's something that is very, very desired on our part as well. i'd also like to respond to just one point very quickly, mr. speaker, before i yield to my good friend from roseville, and say that i can provide my friend from rochester, our distinguished ranking member of the rules committee, assurance that we will not be adjourning the congress today and ending our work. i have said, i said in the rules committee, mr. speaker, that we are going to continue with our work. the action that we're going to take as it relates to these two measures, again, the reconciliation package, which is designed to ensure that, as my friend from rochester has said, that we don't see sequestration which we all know would be devastating, take effect, it is a package of $238 billion over a 10-year perio
: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. smith: madam speaker, i yield as much time as he may consume to the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. cole, who is the sponsor of this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma. mr. cole: i thank you, madam speaker, and i thank the gentleman for yielding. and i would like to ask, madam speaker, at the appropriate time if i could submit a written statement on this particular piece of legislation. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cole: i had a long oration i was going to make but i want to be quite honest. my good friend, chairman smith, and my good friend, chairman lofgren, have covered the case well or better than i can. they're both drished -- distinguished attorneys. they understand the intricacies involved here. so there's no need for me to go through and repeat the points that they've made. i do want to make one central point or two points. first i want to thank both of them. this is a matter of justice. this is a bipartisan effort, to try and make sure th
i did not support her politically, i would support the lady she has been, kind and gentle. mrs. schmidt has managed to disagree with so many of the differences we have in policy and yet the first thing that you would ever see on her face is a smile, asking, how are you feeling? and having a genuine concern about that. and i personally will miss you and miss the greetings we had for each other, sharing each other's family experiences and it's really a classic example of showing what this great body used to be, and what it can become when people can just take a few minutes and realize that we may all come from different political philosophies but we are still brothers and sisters and children of god and i also want to thank the judge for giving me this opportunity to speak to the great buckeye delegation. thank you so much. >> i'd like to -- mr. tiberi: i want to recognize the gentleman from pennsylvania. >> i'd like to recognize the members of the ohio tell gation, mr. steve austria, he's become a good friend a tireless advocate for ohio and his district but even more important
's having. >> reporter: and nearly ten years before that whenned miler made her motion picture debut. ♪ >> reporter: of course, the two have gone on to make us laugh year after year. he was mr. saturday night. >> we were just trying to get back at our ex-husbands. >> reporter: she started a first wives club. >> you have to pay. >> reporter: they are two stars whose stars never crossed -- until now. >> it was a thrill that you offered me the gig. >> well, there was no one else. >> reporter: that's sweet. do you mean that? >> everybody else didn't make sense with me. >> reporter: oh, come on, meryl turned you down. face it. >> all right. >> we're back. did you have fun with the boys? look at this place! we're going to have to call fema. >> reporter: the film also stars three adorable kids and marisa tomei as their uptight mother. but this one isn't just about the laughs. >> well, as the great yogi berra once said, it ain't over till it's over. >> reporter: crystal plays artie, a minor league baseball announcer. >> i love this job. i'm fired? >> he's just lost his job. what is he goin
. when mr. potato head was courting the future mrs. potato head, did he send her a mash note? >> i'm sure he did. somewhere along the line, i'm sure he did. but you know what? that's between those two. >> reporter: in 1964, responding to parents' complaining about rotting potatoes, the two birds got plasticors sews which doubled in size ten years later. along the way, they collected a lot more accessories. how many different parts are there? >> there are 365 different parts for the potato head that we've got going on right now. >> reporter: no wonder he needs that tater tush compartment. yes, that's what it's called. according to mathematicians at columbia university, those hundreds of parts allow for over 500 billion, septillion possible configurations. >> no matter what generation it was, there was always something about his funny personality and kind of the mix and match parts aspect of it that appealed to everybody. >> i'm picasso. >> in 1995 this portly pair went hollywood, alongside woody and buzz light-year in the blockbuster film "toy story." >> oh, my he
to her. >> ticket, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i rise in support of his resolution to condemn the act of a lone gunman in newtown, connecticut, and to offer condolences of the family members and members of the community. i join him in saluting the courage of the teachers and administrators who gave their lives to save the children in their care. to thank the first responders to a live on the scene who not only got survivors to safety but to end the succession of killings happening. those first responders leave their home every day knowing they are going to face danger and they did that day as well. in the face of it, they were heroic, as were the teachers and counselors. this is all the meat to cook -- this has all been laid clear to us. congressman murphy, senator collect murphy, who represents this district would such a distinction and compassion. congressman courtney, congressman john larson, jim hines. all of them spoke with such beauty at our service earlier. the candlelight service. it was so moving to hear their connection to the people there. the president s
not hurt? >>caller: absolutely not because i took the vantage of that. >>host: mr too. >>caller: -- >>caller: =e too. >>caller: it took for ever to try to get hers. >>host: this is for mom, >>caller: yes. >>host: i am so glad you got it before it sells out. . >>caller: is the kindle case still available? >>host: do we have red and orange available? >>caller: do you have the black? >>host: this is a different version with either the mock croc or the solid black. we have the black, orange and the red. >>caller: cannot -- black>>host: kudos to you for getting it for yourself and this get the case because it is more durable than plastic and you can take on the road and this is a sexy case.in the black for everyone and i like the mock croc. i love my and it actually has the mock croc even on the molded (...) >>guest: on the bumpers and that is really nice. >>host: from edge to edge it looks c13 an expensive wallet. we are wildly and you have to take advantage of it now because basically when is gone, it is gone and free shipping and handling and one thing that diane mentio
, and it will be, it will be a testament to her work and her love for her daughter. mr. speaker, i urge the house to pass katie's law and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i yield four minutes to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. pearce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new mexico is recognized for four minutes. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding and i thank the gentleman from california, mr. schiff, for his leadership on this. i rise in strong support of h.r. 6014 today. katie sepich, her picture her here, tells us a lot. she was fun-loving, vibrant, outgoing. she was a leader in our age group. she made things happen. katie, beginning in january of 2002, was in her last year of grad school. during that year, in one of the last conversations with her daughter, her mom asked her daughter the same question that many of us receive from our parents. what are you going to do? when you graduate with your master's degree in business? the reply was the
. >> the next president of the united states. >> reporter: if he was reluctant to run, mr. romney seems to have been under some pressure at home to seriously rally recover. last summer ann urged her husband to enter the race despite his failed bid. >> i was the first one to say this time, you have too do this again. yes, it was going to be painful. yes, it was going to be hard. yes, we might fail, but we had to go forward. >> reporter: a discussion of desire and defeat still lingering. ron mott, nbc news. become hellish for traders. as fiscal cliff talks drag into the 11th hour with $600 billion in tax hikes and spending cuts due to kick in early next year, lawmakers will get back to the table later this week after house speaker john boehner's plan b failed to get enough republican support for a vote last week. >>> still, the market has been resilient. despite friday's decline, the s&p 500 posted its best week in four. and with just five trading sessions left in 2012, the dow has advanced 8% while the s&p 500 climbed 13. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. >>> reports are due this week on pending home s
-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from that sexual assault that night in 1985 was not tested for 20 years. it sat on the shelf in a crime lab somewhere in dallas, texas, because the dallas police department had a new incentive to go and look at those old cases, this case was looked at. that evidence was tested and the dallas police department decided that kevin glenn turner committed this crime back in 1985. but that was 20 years ago. the statute of limitations had run and justice could not occur and lavenia's case, because the system waited too long to find t
: the leader. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the call of the quorum be terminated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i rise today to honor a woman by the name of janice shelton. for her friendship, and 32 years of dedication as an employee of this body, the united states senate. 25 of those years janice worked as my executive assistant. she's demonstrated a sincere dedication to me, my office, my family, and this body, the united states senate. it's an understatement to say that she will be sorely missed. she will be. she's always been kind and thoughtful to me, to my wife landra, all my children, and to everyone that she comes in contact. if there's a problem, everyone knows, go to janice. no one has my ear the past 25 years like janice shelton has. she has been a professional career creating order where there could easily be chaos. over the course of her productive career with the army, the white house, and the senate, have been each -- each benefited from her unique expertise and professionalism and hard work. she began her professional life at the dep
of need. that's what we've always done, and that's what we must do now. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. blumenthal: thank you mr. president. i want to first begin by thanking my colleague from maryland senator mikulski, for her very kind and generous words about the recent tragedy that we suffered in connecticut and her sense of compassion and kindness in the remarks that she just made but also thank her for her vision and courage and leadership on the legislation before us and associate myself with the very eloquent and powerful remarks made by both senators from new york and the senator from new jersey today and i want to strongly oppose the amendments that would constrict and delay aid that is vital to connecticut as it is to the other states of the region that was hammered and pummelled by storm sandy in the night that it hit our area. the scope and scale of destruction made it one of the largest natural disasters to affect our nation. it left millions of people without homes or electricity. it cost tens of billion
adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe mated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you couldn't move without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during this statement, you are a little breathless and it was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> he is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. >> they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now, you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i am
morning. yeah, i take issue with the way the 7.7 jobless rate is determined, and i agree with mr. newman that it probably is in the upper teens. to an extent. i have a daughter who just got her children all, they're in their teens now and she's been looking for a job over the year. i don't know how she could possibly be factored into the jobless rate when they don't even know she exists or that she's looking for a job. i'm sure there are a lot of people like her. i really think the jobless rate is somewhere up in the 20%. thank you for your time. host: mr. newman? guest: for some people, for some groups, the unemployment rate is in the 20%, particularly for young people. i think it's above 20% for young people. i think maybe we pay a little too much attention to the unemployment rate. everybody is right, that you know 7.7% or 7.9%, that absolutely does not tell us everything we need to know about the economy. people think that this is sort of manipulating by the government, in order to conceal numbers that would actually be far worse. that's not true because the government publishes i th
not want to be identified. i said mrs. obama said she knows that the slave owners runs through her veins and she said that we were of the wrong side of history. it seems like a long time ago but it is not. >> host: in fact, you were able to work with to distant cousins. one is black and one is white fade did not know they were related but as a result of your research, they assisted. tell us about your relationship to each other and the book. >> guest: to have a contemporary narrative i thought what the book is about was the sweep of american history through one family with modern-day people grappling these two women i was trying to find the white ancestors and we thought it was someone in the slave owner family. i search for as many descendants as i could and the son of dolphus. i went back and forth to see these women of the family. they were older who really wanted to know. even though they knew what they found out would not be easy. >> host: have they rejected the story or is a universal embrace? the shields a family being the lineage represented by the former slave owner. >> guest: t
saying, we can't go back to school, we can't go back to school. our teacher is dead. mrs. soto, we don't have a teacher. and i couldn't believe it. >> reporter: the school nurse told abc's george stephanopoulos how she crouched under her desk and held her breath. >> while you're under there, you actually see the feet of the shooter? >> i could see him from the knees down. see the legs. >> right in front of you? >> 20 feet away, facing -- his boots were facing my desk. >> then he turned and walked away? >> it was seconds. he turned and walked out. and i heard the door close. >> reporter: and for the rabbi, the tough task of explaining to the faithful where the evil that struck last friday comes from. >> i don't believe that god did this. i believe a crazy man did this. the meaning in it is not trying to understand why god does something. somehow we got here. we have to not necessarily always look towards god but look towards humanity and say what is it that we've done that has created this environment. >> reporter: the clergy of the small new england town say that the horrors of last we
close to me in keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country. and we all cherish her, as she continues to be active and continues to play a role here at the library. so i couldn't come here, and i mentioned nancy fortissimo their aisles with say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from being made in san diego to u.s. senator to governor, to a leader in a variety of ways. i look to pete wilson and to gale as great people who represent the willingness to serve the state and the country in an important way. i want to say, it's always a family engagement if you're out there, thank you both for serving the country but it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] >> i did not you would be with us, but we are thrilled to have you here. callista and i have launched what we call an american legacy book tour. we are very fond of the library, as you know, and we made a movie called ronald reagan -- i want to recognize tonight kevin and his wife are here. kevin w
'm absolutely sure. these two, actually, made her swell with pride even more. have you thought at all about the date, 1902, why that would be so special? it's the coronation of edward vii. - that's right. - certainly this dear mrs. martin, the nanny, would have shared in the great drama that surrounded the coronation of edward vii. and so i believe the people who went to that coronation would have been given a medal such as this. more intimate friends would have been given a brooch where the date 1902 is laid out very precisely on the lid. but i think if we're gonna get a measure of exactly how intimate this relationship is-- and it very clearly is-- we need to look at these stunning telegrams. it says "handed in at sandringham: mrs. martin at sir john knollys' stable yard, st. james' palace," and it says-- and i think this is full of drama, i really do-- "poor dear baba and tiny mama miss nana very much. hope she is well and not too sad." signed "princess of wales." would that be the sadness of queen alexandra's death? what's the date of that? 25. - yes, i suppose that's absolutely right,
tennessee. mr. alexander: i speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. alexander: i want to thank the senator from california for her comments on the senate rules. i agree, this is something we should be able to talk among ourselves and work out. some of us who have been here a little while, watch the senate, know that it is a unique institution and fundamentally most of us are not very happy with the idea -- i think on bodge sidebothsides of the aisle not functioning as effectively as we really should. we need to get bills to the floor and then we need to have amendments. it's been historically the responsibility of the majority to decide what comes to the floor. and historically the minority, whom that happens twhomever thas the opportunity to have amendments. a couple of things have happened. the minority has blocked bills coming to the floor. that didn't happen. it happened 25 years ago. something else happened over the last 25 years. a procedure called filling the tree was invented by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dol
she saved so many kids' lives. >> reporter: i spoke with the parents of a student who saw mrs. soto get shot and they still haven't told their son about her ultimate fate because they think that after everything that's happened this week and everything else that he has seen, including some of his classmates being shot, that they think it's too much to handle at this time. and president obama is going to be here this evening for an interfaith vigil at newtown high school and he's going to try to help heal the community who seems to feel worse with every new piece of information that comes out. >> they were first graders, they were doing kids stuff. it's the kind of stuff you'd send your kids or your grandkids out the door out to first grade. >> and again, counseling will be available at a nearby intermediate school in the gym. we're told that there are grief counselors from across new england and therapy dogs and there's food, a memorial buildingen last night before they wrapped things up for the day, there were about a hundred cars in the parking lot. back to you in new york. >> ali
, the bullets were there. these two wonderful kids were saved by the bravery of the wonderful teacher, mrs. clemens, for which we will ever be thankful for and will never be enough. she pulled them in her own classroom and barricaded the door. they were safe. unfortunately for many families in our town, it's not true. i cannot describe what i feel about that. if we could not -- if we could rewind the reality and prevent what happened, i would give anything to do it. now my story. for many years, i watched what was happening in this country. i am an immigrant. i've been here 22 years. and i -- i held these believes, america has the -- deep history with guns. it's part of american history. gun owners and people who handle guns, they know how to keep them safe and be responsible. our politicians will do whatever they can to make sure our kids are safe. and you know, every time something like columbine, virginia tech, aurora, were happening, i would avert my eyes and i would still think that something will be done. but all those beliefs were shattered on friday. and now i think we all need to
. they are on target, but we need to go further. host: margaret from bowling green, kentucky. caller: mr. stossel seems to be -- i do not know if he has published about different places around the country. good morning. host: turn down your tv and ask her question. caller: tv is turned down. i do not want to ask a question. i just want to make a comment. we seem to have ignored the fact that america at one point had everything. my opinion is that it is because of greed that a lot of companies decided to make money at the top, for getting the middle class and a lower class -- forget in the middle class and a lower cost. guest: we did used to manufacture things and whether it was greed or prophets seeking, there was aggressive pursuit of a lower-cost labor. it made sense -- whether it was profit seeking not or greed, there was aggressive pursuit of a lower- cost labor. it made sense in one respect. people overestimated the benefits, the economic benefits and returns to investment of these lower labor costs. your losing by doing that. one of the commager's earlier did mention something about his -- one of
than $3 billion positive balance. those were aggressive steps that she took. i listened to her but she took those. and i believe that that's the kind of leadership that can help us continue down this path. >> thank you. senator hagen. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and, mr. secretary, thanks for your testimony today. i know that senator corker asked about reverse mortgages. and i am concerned about that issue and i'm particularly concerned that $2.8 billion of the $16 billion economic shortfall are related to that program. can you talk a little bit more about why these losses under the reverse mortgage program are so is he rear? >> here's the fundamental problem. without getting into too much of the history. at one point when fannie mae was issuing these loans, they were generally variable rate and they could -- they allowed a borrower to basically draw on a, you know, over time, the amount of money that they needed. as that program has switched to being a ginny may program, there is basically no option for those borrowers to do anything but draw the full amount. >> and why? >> because we
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)